Durability + Design
Follow us on Twitter Follow us on LinkedIn Like us on Facebook Follow us on Instagram Visit the TPC Store
Search the site

 

D+D News

Main News Page


Paints Teach Color Without Words

Friday, October 16, 2015

More items for Color + Design

Comment | More

How do you describe a blue ocean that isn’t truly “blue?” What about flesh tone that is not actually "beige"?

A pair of Japanese artists has an idea of how to break down the language barrier when it comes to colors, and they are getting ready to bring Nameless Paints to the market this month.

“By not assigning names to the colors we want to expand the definition of what a color can be, and the various shades they can create by mixing them,” said Yusuke Imai, according to the design and arts blog Colossal.

Photos: Kokuyo

Nameless paints aims to help children learn the concepts of color without using language. The product was designed by Japanese artits and comes to market this month.

Imai, working with artist Ayami Moteki, have designed the color tubes with only dots of three primary colors instead of names. The idea, according to the blog PSFK, is to help kids learn to expand their idea of color rather than be persuaded by its associated name, as creators such as Crayola have tried in their marketing plans for years.

Product Development

The blog reports that the product comes in a package of 10 watercolor tubes that use red, blue and yellow to describe the mixture of the color within. The color dots even vary in size according to how much of that color was used to create the mixture.

PFKS noted that Imai originally wanted to expand the color palette to the CMYK color scheme so that black and magenta could be added to the mix. But, it said, that would have resulted in 25 different colors per set; would have made the product more difficult to produce; and would have made Nameless Paints more expensive.

The 10 watercolor tubes use dots of red, blue and yellow to decribe what colors the tube creates.

The paint concept won a 2012 Kokuyo Design Award. The award is offered by the Japanese stationery and company annually to recognize both beautiful and functional products available to the consumer marketplace, according to the design award’s English website.

Spoon & Tango reports that the paints will retail for 1800 yen (US$15) and will be sold by Kokuyo’s stationery brand, Campus, in October.

   

Tagged categories: Aesthetics; Color; Design; Education; Paint; Paint application

Comment Join the Conversation:

Sign in to our community to add your comments.

 
 
 

Technology Publishing Co., 1501 Reedsdale Street, Suite 2008, Pittsburgh, PA 15233

TEL 1-412-431-8300  • FAX  1-412-431-5428  •  EMAIL webmaster@durabilityanddesign.com


The Technology Publishing Network

Durability + Design PaintSquare the Journal of Protective Coatings & Linings Paint BidTracker

 

© Copyright 2012-2018, Technology Publishing Co., All rights reserved