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BIG’s Stadium Design Features Moat

Wednesday, March 16, 2016

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The future home of the Washington Redskins football team may have a moat.

Well, that is if architect Bjarke Ingels’ vision becomes a reality.

The world-renowned Danish designer has been officially selected to design the team’s new stadium, though its whereabouts are still up in the air and its current lease on the FedEx Field in Maryland doesn't expire until 2027, according to reports.

A Recreational Moat

Ingels’ firm, Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) unveiled the conceptual model of the 60,000-seat stadium Sunday (March 13) during a CBS 60 Minutes special profiling the “starchitect.” BIG currently has 60 projects in the works spanning the globe, including Google's new headquarters in Mountain View, CA.

The vision for the stadium features a large, sweeping structure that would be surrounded on all sides by a recreational moat and adjacent green space, according to reports.

“The one thing that everyone is excited about, is that the stadium is designed as much for the tailgating, like the pregame, as for the game itself,” Ingels told CBS.

Additional details about the design and construction were not immediately available Tuesday (March 15).

At least one report offers an explanation as to why a moat around the stadium might be warranted.

"A moat around the former Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Stadium site in D.C. would connect the venue with the nearby Anacostia River, which is popular with kayakers. The design looks like a love letter to the team’s old neighborhood," CityLab reports.

   

Tagged categories: Aesthetics; Architects; Architecture; Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG); Color + Design; Design

Comment from Brian Gingras, (3/17/2016, 12:09 PM)

While the explanation for the moat makes some sense I would be concerned with liability and the risk to children falling into the moat.


Comment from Sarah Geary, (3/18/2016, 8:14 AM)

Then there's the added cost of maintaining this moat as I'm sure it will become a "cesspool" of garbage, mosquitos, and algae. While it will provide additional jobs, it poses more problems than functionality from the perspective of the owner/manager.


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