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August 2 - August 7, 2015

A Pennsylvania roofer is facing 25 years in prison for lying, and ordering employees to lie, to OSHA inspectors after a worker was killed in a 45-foot fall. Does the potential punishment fit the crime?



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A Pennsylvania roofer is facing 25 years in prison for lying, and ordering employees to lie, to OSHA inspectors after a worker was killed in a 45-foot fall. Does the potential punishment fit the crime?

Answers Votes
Yes. Impeding a federal investigation is serious business. 9%
No. This should be a civil matter, not a criminal one. 91%


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Tagged categories: Enforcement; Health and safety; OSHA

Comment from M. Halliwell, (8/4/2015, 11:54 AM)

Hmmm...tough call. If it is proven that the contractor's actions (i.e. not providing fall arrest, training or similar) were contributing factors to the fatal fall, then I suppose it could be argued that it shows knowledge of the negligence which would be akin to evidence of premeditation in a murder. I can see trying for 25 years in the death...but I'm not sure the lying and having others lie alone quite meets the mark for a 25 year sentence.


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